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Welcome to Winterbear

Winterbear is my personal website for sharing trip reports, writing, photography, videos, gear reviews, outdoor advice, and other info related to adventuring in the great Alaska outdoors (and occasionally beyond). Browse around as much as you’d like and always feel free to get in touch.

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Recent Guidebook Entries

Intel on Alaska hikes, climbs, paddles, bushwacks, and tumbles.

Campbell Creek (6/14/2017) - Campbell Creek is a splashy, meandering Class I/II creek that originates in the Chugach Mountains and flows southeast through the urban center of Anchorage, Alaska. Most boaters will float some portion of the 8-mile section between the Piper St cul-de-sac and the Dimond Blvd bridge.
Campbell Creek (6/14/2017) - Campbell Creek is a splashy, meandering Class I/II creek that originates in the Chugach Mountains and flows southeast through the urban center of Anchorage, Alaska. Most boaters will float some portion of the 8-mile section between the Piper St cul-de-sac and the Dimond Blvd bridge.
North Suicide Peak (2/17/2017) - North Suicide Peak is a rugged 5,065-foot pyramid at the head of Rabbit Valley, near the southwest corner of Chugach State Park. North Suicide and South Suicide Peak are connected by a wind-swept col halfway between their bases at Rabbit Lake and their virtually equal-heighted summits, inviting an allusion to Siamese twins connected at the hips.
Campbell Creek (6/14/2017) - Campbell Creek is a splashy, meandering Class I/II creek that originates in the Chugach Mountains and flows southeast through the urban center of Anchorage, Alaska. Most boaters will float some portion of the 8-mile section between the Piper St cul-de-sac and the Dimond Blvd bridge.
North Suicide Peak (2/17/2017) - North Suicide Peak is a rugged 5,065-foot pyramid at the head of Rabbit Valley, near the southwest corner of Chugach State Park. North Suicide and South Suicide Peak are connected by a wind-swept col halfway between their bases at Rabbit Lake and their virtually equal-heighted summits, inviting an allusion to Siamese twins connected at the hips.
Rainbow Peak (12/2/2016) - I often think of Rainbow Peak as a kind of "Flattop for locals." Both peaks are easily accessible from Anchorage, take a half day or less to climb, and are almost the same height (3,543' for Rainbow and 3,510' for Flattop). Both sit on the edge of Chugach State Park and punch above their weight in terms of views. But Rainbow is without a doubt a longer, more difficult (and arguably, more rewarding) venture.